Posts filed under ‘Poetry’

How to Live on Other Planets: A Handbook for Aspiring Aliens

  • ISBN 978-1-937794-33-0 (epub) for iPad, Nook, etc. forthcoming.
  • ISBN 978-1-937794-31-6 (mobi) for Kindle from Amazon forthcoming.
  • ISBN 978-1-937794-32-3 (pdf) forthcoming.

How to Live on Other Planets: A Handbook for Aspiring Aliens explores the immigrant experience in a science fiction setting, with exciting fiction and poetry from some of the genre’s best writers.

 

Table of Contents:

  • Dean Francis Alfar, “Ohkti”
  • Celia Lisset Alvarez, “Malibu Barbie Moves to Mars”
  • R.J. Astruc, “A Believer’s Guide to Azagarth”
  • Lisa Bao, “like father, like daughter”
  • Pinckney Benedict, “Zog-19: A Scientific Romance”
  • Lisa Bolekaja, “The Saltwater African”
  • Mary Buchinger, “Transplanted”
  • Zen Cho, “The Four Generations of Chang E”
  • Abbey Mei Otis, “Blood, Blood”
  • Tina Connolly, “Turning the Apples”
  • Indrapramit Das, “muo-ka’s Child”
  • Tom Doyle, “The Floating Otherworld”
  • Peg Duthie, “With Light-Years Come Heaviness”
  • Thomas Greene, “Zero Bar”
  • Benjamin S. Grossberg, “The Space Traveler’s Husband,” “The Space Traveler and the Promised Planet” and “The Space Traveler and Boston”
  • Minal Hajratwala, “The Unicorn at the Racetrack”
  • Julie Bloss Kelsey, “tongue lashing” and “the itch of new skin”
  • Rose Lemberg, “The Three Immigrations”
  • Ken Liu, “Ghost Days”
  • Alex Dally MacFarlane, “Found”
  • Anil Menon, “Into The Night”
  • Joanne Merriam, “Little Ambushes”
  • Mary Anne Mohanraj, “Jump Space”
  • Daniel José Older, “Phantom Overload”
  • Sarah Pinsker, “The Low Hum of Her”
  • Elyss G. Punsalan, “Ashland”
  • Benjamin Rosenbaum, “The Guy Who Worked For Money”
  • Erica L. Satifka, “Sea Changes”
  • Nisi Shawl, “In Colors Everywhere”
  • Marge Simon, “South”
  • Sonya Taaffe, “Di Vayse Pave”
  • Bogi Takács, “The Tiny English-Hungarian Phrasebook For Visiting Extraterrestrials”
  • Bryan Thao Worra, “Dead End In December” and “The Deep Ones”
  • Deborah Walker, “Speed of Love”
  • Nick Wood, “Azania”

9 February 2014

Marilyn Monroe: Poems

Marilyn Monroe: Poems: released on 30 November 2013.

Lyn Lifshin has written an astonishing portrait of the real Marilyn Monroe, inside the icon. These poems imagine Norma Jean Baker’s inner thoughts about Hollywood, love, her work, her memories, her hopes, and the sorrows that eventually led to her overdose from sleeping pills in 1962. Lifshin gives us Marilyn the toy, Marilyn the mother, and Marilyn the survivor, in a remarkable tour de force.

This book was originally published in 1994 by Quiet Lion Press.

 

Poems from the book available online:

 

Lifshin on Marilyn Monroe: Poems:

If I have nothing, or very little on the subject, it’s like a starter’s gun go get me going. You could say I get carried away, obsessive and excessive! I love the feeling of being lost in something I never planned to write or think about. I love “assignments,” suggestions that take me on a road I’ve never been on. A forthcoming collection of Barbie poems and my book MARILYN MONROE came from wanting to write something for the Mondo books Rick Peabody was editing. I had just begun to spend time in DC, felt isolated, alone and I wanted to write some Marilyn Monroe poems for the collection. I thought of Marilyn feeling the same way, wandered through museums imagining her at the same exhibits, in the same galleries, penthouses, subways.

—Lyn Lifshin, “An Interview With Lyn Lifshin
by Nathan Leslie
,” Word Riot, 2011

 

Critical Praise for Lyn Lifshin:

Here she is! Might as well stop fighting it. Lifshin is not going to go away. For men, she’s sexy. For women she’s an archetype of gutsy independence. As a poet, she’s nobody but herself. Frightening prolific and utterly intense. One of a kind.

San Francisco Review of Books

Few poets can permeate the heart of things as Lyn Lifshin does.

—Alice Pero, review of All the Poets Who Have Touched Me

In the decades I’ve read Lifshin poems she is invariably interesting. Like dancing, the poems in this book are on the move in a variation of emotions usually with lovers, ex-lovers, or would be lovers. The speaker moves through the narrative with clarity and is utterly convincing in Lifshin’s unique idiom. There’s a breathing humanity in these poems, which future generations can read to feel the grit and grace of feminine life in our era.

—William Page, review of Ballroom

30 November 2013

Lyn Lifshin

Lyn Lifshin is one of the most widely published poets in the world. She has published over 90 collections of poetry and her work has appeared in countless magazines, including American Poetry Review, Abraxas, Chelsea, Ms. Magazine, New York Quarterly, Ohio Review, Ploughshares, and Rolling Stone, and anthologies, including Ghosts of the Holocaust: An Anthology of Poetry by the Second Generation, Lyrotica: An Anthology of Erotic Poetry and Prose, and Lipsmack!: A Sampler Platter of Poets from NightBallet Press. Her awards include the Hart Crane Memorial Award, the Jack Kerouac Award for Kiss The Skin Off, the Paterson Poetry Award for Before It’s Light, and the Texas Review Award for The Licorice Daughter: My Year with Ruffian. She is also the subject of Mary Ann Lynch’s 1989 documentary film, Not Made Of Glass. For more information, see her web site: www.lynlifshin.com.

 

Books for Upper Rubber Boot:

Marilyn Monroe: Poems: released on 30 November 2013.

  • ISBN 978-1-937794-30-9 (epub) is available for iPad, Nook, etc. at Barnes & Noble (USA & UK).
  • ISBN 978-1-937794-28-6 (mobi) is available for Kindle on Amazon (AU, BR, CA, DE, ES, FR, IN, IT, JP, MX, UK, USA).
  • ISBN 978-1-937794-29-3 (pdf) is available at Smashwords.

1 May 2013

The Sky Needs More Work

The Sky Needs More Work: poems by Corey Mesler, forthcoming 2014.

  • ISBN 978-1-937794-42-2 (epub) is forthcoming for iPad, Nook, etc.
  • ISBN 978-1-937794-40-8 (mobi) is forthcoming for Kindle on Amazon.
  • ISBN 978-1-937794-41-5 (pdf) is forthcoming at Smashwords.
TheSkyNeedsMoreWork-Cover

30 March 2013

Hiss of Leaves

Explore the subtle beauty of beetles, trash in the wind, cigar boxes, snail trails, bottle caps, sheets snapping on the line, and more. This contemplative haiku chapbook by T. D. Ingram will help you cultivate a greater awareness of the magnificent in the everyday, and open your heart to the beauty inherent in everything.

 

From Hiss of Leaves:

 
silence
heat weights the air
then crickets

 
fall morning
monarchs fly
with the leaves

 
hiss of leaves
sheets snap
on the line

 

Poems from the book available online:

These links all open in a new window.

  • five haiku at The Haiku Foundation, part of The Haiku Registry and included in THF Haiku App: “hiss of leaves” [originally Editors Choice, South by Southeast 11:1 (2004) and Tinywords (April 21, 2005)]; “last freight car” [originally South by Southeast 14:3 (2007)]; “fall morning” [originally South by Southeast 11:1 (2004)]; “hawk circles” [originally South by Southeast 10:1 (2003)]; “clear evening” [originally South by Southeast 12:2 (2005)].
  • the silence,” A Hundred Gourds 1:1 December 2011.
  • noonday heat,” Red Dragonfly, August 19, 2011.

 

Reviews:

These poems necessarily embrace the seasons and the natural world, but they also embrace the mundane world of humans. For instance, “bottle caps”:

     bottle caps
     stuck in blacktop
     small planets

One my favorites, “the brightness”:

     the brightness
     of the full moon
     deepens the cold

I have yet to experience the snow in the high desert of Oregon to see if this is true here also, but it is certainly true in the Midwest and other places I’ve been. It seems as if the light from the full moon, illuminating the world it shines on, ought make the winter night a little warmer but it has the exact opposite effect. The poet has caught this perfectly.

— Mark Lindner, “Ingram, Hiss of Leaves,” Habitually Probing Generalist, 26 September 2012.

1 comment 11 August 2012

Couplets: a multi-author poetry blog tour

Upper Rubber Boot Books coordinated this multi-author blog tour for April, to help promote poetry and poets for National Poetry Month.

 

Entries

  1. 1 April 2012: what we make waiting for death (Lyn Lifshin at Joanne Merriam).
  2. 1 April 2012: Kristine Ong Muslim on Arlene Ang’s “Living Without Water” (guest post) (at Peg Duthie’s zirconium).
  3. 1 April 2012: Gillena Cox (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose)).
  4. 1 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés – Neil Aitken (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry).
  5. 1 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Guest Post #1, Stella Pierides . . . (at Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle)
  6. 1 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Margaret Dornaus (at Stella Pierides: Literature, Art, Culture, Society).
  7. 2 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Guest Post #2, Jenny Ward Angyal . . . (at Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle)
  8. 2 April 2012: Margaret Dornaus (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose)).
  9. 3 April 2012: how will we translate ourselves? (Deirdre Dwyer at Joanne Merriam).
  10. 3 April 2012: Couplets: a multi-author poetry blog tour — Marty Smith (at Shiteki Na Usagi [T.A. Smith/Yousei Hime])
  11. 3 April 2012: Translation in poetry: thorny problems — a guest post by Sue Burke (at Heather Kamins: fiction, poetry, and other necessities)
  12. 3 April 2012: Yousei Hime (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose)).
  13. 3 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Guest Post #3, Cara Holman . . . (at Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle)
  14. 3 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés – Hannah Stephenson (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry).
  15. 4 April 2012: Couplets Blog Tour: Carol Berg Hosts Peg Duthie (at Ophelia Unraveling)
  16. 4 April 2012: Christina Nguyen (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  17. 4 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Guest Post #4, Christina Nguyen (at Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle)
  18. 4 April 2012: Featured “Couplets” Poet: Margaret Dornaus (at Christina Nguyen’s A wish for the sky…)
  19. 4 April 2012: Start with a number . . . (Sonja deVries, Yael Flusberg, Janine Harrison, Jaime Lee Jarvis, and Margaret Rozga at JoAnne Growney’s Intersections — Poetry with Mathematics)
  20. 5 April 2012: writing is my excuse for being myself (Jenniey Tallman at Joanne Merriam).
  21. 5 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Guest Post #5, Kirsten Cliff . . . (at Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle)
  22. 5 April 2012: Poetry of the Urban Pastoral (Celia Lisset Alvarez at Scattered Showers in a Clear Sky: Poetry, Gardening, Birding, and other reflections on life [Anne Higgins])
  23. 5 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — S. Abbas Raza (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry).
  24. 5 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Lisa J. Cihlar (at Stella Pierides: Literature, Art, Culture, Society).
  25. 5 April 2012: Marty Smith (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  26. 6 April 2012: Don’t Wait (Carol Berg at Mary Alexandra Agner)
  27. 6 April 2012: Stella Pierides (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  28. 7 April 2012: A sestina (“Safety in Numbers”) — and variations (Harry Mathews at JoAnne Growney’s Intersections — Poetry with Mathematics)
  29. 7 April 2012: The poem itself should tell the reader the melody of itself by way of its combination of words. (Jericho Brown [autoplays music] at Joanne Merriam)
  30. 7 April 2012: “Books teach me to attend to this world” — a guest post by Lynn Domina (at Heather Kamins: fiction, poetry, and other necessities)
  31. 7 April 2012: Deb Scott (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  32. 7 April 2012: Introducing Community Activist/Poet/Playwright Bryan Thao Worra (at Wendy’s Muse [Wendy Brown-Baez])
  33. 7 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Ayesha Chatterjee (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry)
  34. 8 April 2012: Fiona Robyn (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  35. 9 April 2012: Guest Post: Mary Alexandra Agner (at The Wordsmith’s Forge: The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette)
  36. 9 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Guest Post #6, Alegria Imperial . . . (at Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle)
  37. 9 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — O.P.W. Fredericks (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry)
  38. 9 April 2012: it requires practice, a lot of it (Christine Klocek-Lim at Joanne Merriam
  39. 9 April 2012: Andrea Grillo (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  40. 10 April 2012: Measured Extravagance by Peg Duthie (a review) (at Renee Emerson’s This Quiet Hour)
  41. 10 April 2012: guest post: poems by Christina Nguyen (at Peg Duthie’s zirconium)
  42. 10 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Guest Post #7, Claire Everett (at Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle)
  43. 10 April 2012: Kirsten Cliff (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  44. 11 April 2012: GUEST BLOG & INTERVIEW – Heather Kamins – BLUESHIFTING (at Steve Vernon’s Old Fart Rambles)
  45. 11 April 2012: Interview with Steve Vernon (at Heather Kamins)
  46. 11 April 2012: Couplets Blog Tour: Pat Valdata’s Inherent Vice (at Celia Lisset Alvarez’s Writing with Celia)
  47. 11 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Karen J. Weyant (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry)
  48. 11 April 2012: Open My Mouth and Sky (Ching-In Chen at Mary Alexandra Agner)
  49. 11 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Guest Post #8, Pamela Cooper . . . (at Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle)
  50. 11 April 2012: there must be a lot of power in that quiet space for there to be an all-out onslaught against it in our culture (Jeff Hardin at Joanne Merriam).
  51. 11 April 2012: Marie Marshall (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  52. 12 April 2012: Math or poetry — must one choose? (Eveline Pye at JoAnne Growney’s Intersections — Poetry with Mathematics)
  53. 12 April 2012: Ojibway Poet Heid Erdrich and the Craft of Writing (at Wendy Brown-Baez’s Wendy’s Muse)
  54. 12 April 2012: 3 Questions for Mary Alexandra Agner (at Miriam Sagan’s Miriam’s Well: Poetry, Land Art, and Beyond)
  55. 12 April 2012: Couplets Blog Tour: “Why Getting Small Details Right Matters,” by Pat Valdata (at Celia Lisset Alvarez’s Writing with Celia)
  56. 12 April 2012: James Brush (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  57. 12 April 2012: Featured “Couplets” Poet: Sue Burke (at Christina Nguyen’s A wish for the sky…)
  58. 12 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Guest Post #9, Andrea Grillo . . . (at Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle)
  59. 13 April 2012: Beginning with a Question (guest post by Lynn Domina) (at Kristine Ong Muslim)
  60. 13 April 2012: haiga: a powder brush (Peg Duthie at Joanne Merriam)
  61. 13 April 2012: Cara Holman (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  62. 14 April 2012: Contemporary American Women Poets: Kate Daniels and Jane Hirschfield (Anne Higgins at The Wordsmith’s Forge: The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette)
  63. 14 April 2012: Aubrie Cox (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  64. 14 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — John Amen (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry)
  65. 16 April 2012: Featured “Couplets” Poet: Mary Rose Betten (at Christina Nguyen’s A wish for the sky…)
  66. 15 April 2012: Statistics — a lament (Robert J. MacG. Dawson at JoAnne Growney’s Intersections — Poetry with Mathematics)
  67. 15 April 2012: get out of the way of writing the poem (Sue Goyette at Joanne Merriam)
  68. 15 April 2012: On Translation, by Carol Berg (at Sue Burke‘s Mount Orégano)
  69. 15 April 2012: Johannes Berg (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  70. 16 April 2012: The poet’s process — a guest post by Peg Duthie (at Heather Kamins)
  71. 16 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Donna Vorreyer (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry)
  72. 16 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Guest Post #10, Sanjukta Asopa . . . (at Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle)
  73. 16 April 2012: Marie Marshall (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  74. 17 April 2012: Interview with John Amen (at Heather Kamins: fiction, poetry, and other necessities)
  75. 17 April 2012: Couplets Poetry Tour & Sharing Your Story (Renee Emerson at Michele Fischer’s Finding Your Voice)
  76. 17 April 2012: beauty and its role in all of this (Wendy Babiak at Joanne Merriam)
  77. 17 April 2012: National Poetry Month: Guest Post #11, Annie Juhl . . . (at Margaret Dornaus’ Haiku-doodle)
  78. 17 April 2012: Christina Nguyen (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  79. 18 April 2012: Following Euler In Koenigsberg (Paula Bonnell at JoAnne Growney’s Intersections — Poetry with Mathematics)
  80. 18 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Jim Daniels (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry).
  81. 18 April 2012: Fiona Robyn (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  82. 19 April 2012: Blueshifting by Heather Kamins (a review) (at Renee Emerson’s This Quiet Hour)
  83. 19 April 2012: Couplets: Interview with Wendy Brown-Baez (at Francis Scudellari’s Caught In The Stream)
  84. 19 April 2012: Featured “Couplets” Poet: Cara Holman (at Christina Nguyen’s A wish for the sky…)
  85. 19 April 2012: I tend to approach poems as puzzles. (Kate Buckley at Joanne Merriam)
  86. 19 April 2012: Andrea Grillo (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  87. 20 April 2012: Poetry Temptations, an interview with Diane Lockward (Wendy Brown-Baez)
  88. 20 April 2012: Revision in Science Fiction Poetry (Elizabeth Barrette at Peg Duthie’s zirconium)
  89. 20 April 2012: Couplets Tour: Carol Berg hosts Anne Higgins (at Carol Berg’s Ophelia Unraveling)
  90. 20 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Darla C. R. d’Aubigné (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry).
  91. 20 April 2012: Marie Marshall (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  92. 21 April 2012: Statistics — math to improve man’s lot (Mary Alexandra Agner at JoAnne Growney’s Intersections — Poetry with Mathematics)
  93. 21 April 2012: The Scruff of Poetry (Christina Nguyen at Mary Alexandra Agner’s Pantoums & Persistence)
  94. 21 April 2012: Couplets Blog Tour: Opening the Dream Cabinet with Guest Ann Fisher-Wirth (at Celia Lisset Alvarez’s Writing with Celia)
  95. 21 April 2012: Deb Scott (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  96. 22 April 2012: 3 Questions for Heather Kamins (at Miriam Sagan’s Miriam’s Well: Poetry, Land Art, and Beyond)
  97. 22 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — David W. Landrum (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry).
  98. 22 April 2012: Couplets: a multi-author poetry blog tour — Angie Werren (at T.A. Smith/Yousei Hime’s Shiteki Na Usagi)
  99. 22 April 2012: Yousei Hime (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  100. 23 April 2012: Guest Post by Carol Berg (at The Wordsmith’s Forge: The Writing & Other Projects of Elizabeth Barrette)
  101. 23 April 2012: Couplets: Interview with Iris Jamahl Dunkle (at Francis Scudellari’s Caught In The Stream)
  102. 23 April 2012: Guest Post by Stella Pierides (at Sabra Wineteer’s The Bloomin’ Blog)
  103. And They Were Never Afraid (Sherry Chandler at Mary Alexandra Agner’s Pantoums & Persistence)
  104. 23 April 2012: Featured “Couplets” Poet: Julene Tripp Weaver (at Christina Nguyen’s A wish for the sky…)
  105. 23 April 2012: Margaret Dornaus (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  106. 24 April 2012: Macbeth and Probabiliby (Michael Round at JoAnne Growney’s Intersections — Poetry with Mathematics)
  107. 24 April 2012: Exploring the blueshift on the Couplets blog tour (review of Blueshifting at Sherry Chandler‘s blog)
  108. 24 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Catherine Rogers (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry)
  109. 24 April 2012: Fiona Robyn (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  110. 25 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Timothy Green (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry)
  111. 25 April 2012: balance and flexibility: Molly Peacock part one (at Joanne Merriam)
  112. 25 April 2012: Couplets: Crossing Genres with Iris Dunkle (at Wendy Brown-Baez’s Wendy’s Muse)
  113. 25 April 2012: Fiona Robyn (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  114. 26 April 2012: Kathy Uyen Nguyen (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  115. 26 April 2012: Couplets: My life as a poet (Anne Higgins at Sue Burke‘s Mount Orégano)
  116. 26 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Lizzy Swane (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry)
  117. 26 April 2012: NaPoMonth Guest: Mary Alexandra Agner (at Stella Pierides: Literature, Art, Culture, Society)
  118. 27 April 2012: elbow grease and enthusiasm: Molly Peacock part two (at Joanne Merriam)
  119. 27 April 2012: Couplets Blog Tour: Carol Berg Hosts Pat Valdata (at Carol Berg’s Ophelia Unraveling)
  120. 27 April 2012: Poetry with Math — BRIDGES 2012, Limericks (John Ciardi at JoAnne Growney’s Intersections — Poetry with Mathematics)
  121. 27 April 2012: Couplets Poetry Tour & Sharing Your Story (Lisa Cihlar at Michele Fischer’s Finding Your Voice)
  122. 27 April 2012: Stella Pierides (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  123. 28 April 2012: Three Poetry Reviews for National Poetry Month: reviews of Heather Kamins’ Blueshifting, Peg Duthie’s Measured Extravagance and Gail White’s Sonnets in a Hostile World (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry)
  124. 28 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Stephen Bunch (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry)
  125. 28 April 2012: Weaving Words, an interview with Ned Haggard (at Wendy Brown-Baez’s (Wendy’s Muse)
  126. 28 April 2012: Couplets Blog Tour: Celia Lisset Alvarez on Poetry & Politics (at Sunslick Starfish: chronicling the amazing ideas and adventures of Ching-In Chen: Writer & Community Organizer)
  127. 28 April 2012: From Nature’s Patient Hands: For Couplets, Elizabeth Barrette (at Wendy Babiak’s What I Meant to Say)
  128. 28 April 2012: Marty Smith (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  129. 29 April 2012: Cara Holman (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))
  130. 29 April 2012: not to edit out the surprises (Diane Lockward at Joanne Merriam)
  131. 30 April 2012: Science, Sonnets and Speculation: Peg Duthie (at Joanne Merriam)
  132. 30 April 2012: Inquiring Minds and Other Clichés — Oliver de la Paz (at Christine Klocek-Lim’s November Sky Poetry)
  133. 30 April 2012: Deb Scott (at Angie Werren’s feathers: micropoetry (and tinyprose))

 

Blogroll

70 comments 30 April 2012

T. D. Ingram


Photo credit Ally Ingram

T. D. Ingram is a retired advertising writer-producer-director who has been writing haiku, senryu, haibun and tanka since 2002. Born and raised in Southern Illinois, he now resides in Texas. His poems have appeared in Ambrosia, Atlas Poetica, Handful of Stones, Notes From the Gean, River of Stones, Seven by Twenty, Sketchbook, South by Southeast and Tinywords. Find him at tdi.posterous.com or on Twitter as Haikujots.

 

Books for Upper Rubber Boot:

Contemplative haiku chapbook Hiss of Leaves was released August 2012.

T. D. Ingram is one of 119 contributors to 140 And Counting.

2 April 2012

Measured Extravagance

Employing sonnets and sestinas as well as open forms, Measured Extravagance lyrically documents the messiness of grief and explores the complexity of devotion. Peg Duthie celebrates the conflicting demands of journeys as she travels from a Nashville recording studio to a congested street in Prague to the Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem, and introduces us to sharpshooters, scientists, musicians, bakers, the dead and those living on the edges of reality as they romp past boundaries, rage at expectations, and tangle with skepticism and belief. Read this book—and throw jump shots with Shakespeare, play duets with Heisenberg, and find out what relish trays and rifles really have in common.

 

From Measured Extravagance:

 
The Sharpshooter Assembles a Relish Tray

 
Some afternoons, everything she touches
reminds her of how bodies are so soft,
even as she delicately wields
chopsticks, toothpicks, tongs, and teaspoons
to place the artichoke hearts just so
among the starflowers carved from radishes.
Eggs with sesame-seed eyes and carrot-sliver beaks
nest within mounds of curly herbs. Around some people,
she can’t helping wanting to claim that it’s all
for the sake of her daughter, whether “it” is the it
of resolutely drilling fake pigeons and falling plates
to defeat the dreams that insist on plaguing
her nights with paper golems and phantom goons
or the it of donning lipstick and hose and heels
as a gesture not of submission but grace, the uniform
of the Sunday suppers she manages to attend. It
is indeed for her daughter—the being prepared
for both monsters and manners—but it is not all.
It would be a meal of only meat, just as a life
without her partner and child would be merely
a serving of stems. She scoops a spare olive
into her mouth, savoring its slide across her tongue:
salt. flesh. seed. The tray is a passable garden
but in the end, it is but an end—its meaning a matter
of preserves and pretenses, a prelude to sustenance.

 

Poems from the book available online:

These links all open in a new window.

 

Reviews:

Contemporary poetry on Jewish religious subjects is rare in America outside the pages of specialized Jewish publications. Thus, Peg Duthie’s delightful new collection Measured Extravagance (Upper Rubber Boot Books) is doubly welcome… Peg is a poet we must hope to hear more from.

— Martin Berman-Gorvine, “A Measured Feast,” InTheMoment, 25 September 2012.

I’m delighted. Extravagant and clever, the poem is a fitting introduction to a collection that spans decades, personages, and cities with ease…

Toward the end of the collection we end up in Chicago, England, and Boston in “Between the Hints.” The speaker muses about “what we can make is what // will do for now. . .” Oh how we humans are forever striving! Duthie cleverly twists that idea into all its permutations within the rhymes of this poem’s form, using iambic pentameter and quatrameter so wickedly that the reader doesn’t even realize how smoothly he/she has been schooled.

In all, Peg Duthie has put together a thoroughly extravagant collection of poems. The reader journeys through locations of the mind as well as those of the earth; I was never quite sure what I’d get as I turned the page, but I was always surprised. As the speaker says in the poem “Extravagance”—”Such a feast.”

— Christine Klocek-Lim, “Three Poetry Reviews for National Poetry Month,” November Sky Poetry, 28 April 2012.

The title appears to be an oxymoron. How can something measured be extravagant? We can ask that question of poetry itself. Taking it to the bard as we shoot hoops, we might ask how it’s possible to seize something as tight and as structured as a sonnet and stuff it full to bursting. The answer… well, the whole book is an answer to that question.

We might just as easily ask the same question of life, with its well-defined form and obvious boundaries. How can we live extravagantly within our measured years? In “As She’s Dying”, we meet a mother intent on not living while she was alive: “she/who regarded my writing as a squandering/of time and ovaries.” And in its companion poem, “A Stack of Cards”, we imagine a quiet moment after the funeral, going through the mother’s things, “this mourning of a life you wouldn’t have lived/even if you’d had the heart for it.” Both poems are 13 lines, not rondeaus, sort of deformed sonnets if you like, a bit clipped like the mother they contemplate.

A life lived within the measure of its confines is no life at all, but a life lived with extravagance becomes more than the sum of its years.

— David Allan Barker, “Review: Measured Extravagance, by Peg Duthie,” Nouspique, 20 April 2012.

…it’s a sestina, and a good one! I’m not typically a big fan of form poems—with sestinas about half way through the poem I usually feel like, as a reader, that I can see the writer trying too hard to get those end-words in—but Duthie seamlessly blends them in.

— Renee Emerson, “Measured Extravagance by Peg Duthie (a review),” This Quiet Hour, 10 April 2012.

What I admire most about this book is Peg Duthie’s masterful treatment of highly politicized topics (such as the political inclinations of well-known scientists) into a non-politically-correct lattice… Measured Extravagance delivers. What a gorgeous collection!

— Kristine Ong Muslim, “on Peg Duthie’s ‘Marvelous Extravagance’,” 1 April 2012.

I think my favorite, my best delight, in this volume, was ‘Deep and Crisp and Even,’ which title will make those who know me go, well, of course–and it’s got apples and snow and winter, but it’s Peg’s Nashville winter and not my own, parallax again, different views, different angles. I love this. I reread it already. I will reread it again.

And sometimes things find you where you are and you don’t entirely wish to say why, and ‘Hymn’ is like that, and if it finds you where you are, too, you will know. Recommended.

— Marissa Lingen, “Measured Extravagance, by Peg Duthie,” Barnstorming on an Invisible Segway, 21 March 2012.

2 comments 14 March 2012

Peg Duthie

Peg Duthie shares an old house in Nashville, Tennessee, with a tall mechanic, a large dog, and a small piano. She works as an indexer and copyeditor, and there’s more about her at www.nashpanache.com.

 

Books for Upper Rubber Boot:

Measured Extravagance lyrically documents the messiness of grief and explores the complexity of devotion.

Peg Duthie is one of 119 contributors to 140 And Counting.

1 comment 1 February 2012

sweating lemonade

If it’s surprising how much of your universe is sea serpents, you’re likely to become a fantasy writer. If it’s surprising how much of your universe is lemonade, I guess the answers are chef and poet, and Heather Kamins went with poet.
…read more

Marissa Lingen has just posted a review of Blueshifting.

1 January 2012

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